Quality Critters for Pleasure & Show

        FLUFFY FRENCH BULLDOGS

  

PLEASE EXCUSE US AS WE ARE STILL WORKING                     ON THIS PAGE.

     

      Let me just say that we have been working very hard and are proud to announce that we are now breeding long hair/ Fluffy French Bulldogs! It has taken us well over a year to find just the right parents to add to our program. Our fluffies are all purebred AKC registered dogs!!! We will be adding some new Long Hair Carrying (LHC) studs and a Recessive Black Blue FLUFFY (dd Bb(?) aa Em/e) stud to our program as well as a few new LHC females! We are very excited about our new program so PLEASE bare with us as we create these new pages. 

        ~ Thank You


 WHAT CROSS WAS USED TO CREATE A LONG HAIRED FRENCH BULLDOG? Certainly they must be a cross? A gene can't just hide in their DNA.... Can it?

The chestnut (red) gene is a recessive gene in the Friesian breed of horse which is a completely black breed of horse. It laid dormant and hidden in that breed for several, several decades before a chestnut (red) foal was born and openly sold as a purebred Friesian. If only one or two lines carry a recessive gene, it could be 100+ years before two of those lines found each other and both passed on a recessive gene. So it is very possible that this gene has remained hidden since the original crossing that created the French bulldog. Unfortunately and as disgusting as I find this many breeders will kull any puppies born that do not fit the breed standards so it’s possible there have been long-haired French bulldogs born throughout the decades but they were killed by their breeders to hide what they considered an imperfection. It’s also possible it was introduced 20 or so plus years ago when people were trying to introduce other colors and patterns such as merle. The majority of animals crossed to bring in the merle pattern were long haired dogs. Also my opinion as to where the original testable chocolate came in from as the majority of merle dogs known as “red merle “ are actually (testable) chocolates Such as red merle Australian Shepherd’s for example. (not saying people use Australian Shepherd’s to bring in the merle pattern but using this as an example as ‘red’ technically does not really exist in many breeds and it is actually a testable chocolate). Truth of the matter is we may never know where the long-haired gene came from But it has been documented in this breed for well over 10+ years.